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2016 NFL Shutouts

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tags: In team sports, a shutout (US) or clean sheet (UK) is a game in which one team prevents the other from scoring any points. While possible in most major sports, they are highly improbable in some sports, such as basketball. In football the one with most clean sheet is conceded the best defensive team.[1]

Shutouts are usually seen as a result of effective defensive play even though a weak opposing offense may be as much to blame. Some sports credit individual players, particularly goalkeepers and starting pitchers, with shutouts and keep track of them as statistics; others do not.

A shutout in American football is uncommon but not exceptionally rare. Keeping an opponent scoreless in American football requires a team’s defense to be able to consistently shut down both pass and run offenses over the course of a game. The difficulty of completing a shutout is compounded by the many ways a team can score in the game. For example, teams can attempt field goals, which have a high rate of success. The range of NFL caliber kickers makes it possible for a team with a weak offense to get close enough (within 50 yards) to the goalposts and kick a field goal. In the decade of the 2000s there were 89 shutouts in 2,544 NFL regular-season games, for an average of slightly more than one shutout every two weeks in an NFL season.

There are at least five instances in American football in which a team had been shut out throughout an entire season, and four in which a team has shut out all of their opponents in the season (the longest of these being the ten-game perfect season in which the 1933 Providence Huskies did not concede a single point).[2]

The achievement of a shutout is much more difficult in Canadian football, where scoring and offensive movement is generally more frequent and a single point can be scored simply by punting the ball from any point on the field into the end zone.

2016 NFL Shutouts

The Bills–Patriots rivalry is a professional American football rivalry between the Buffalo Bills and the New England Patriots. Both teams are members of the East division of the American Football Conference (AFC) in the National Football League (NFL). The teams play two scheduled games each season as a result. The series debuted in 1960 as part of the American Football League (AFL). As of October 2016, the Patriots lead the series 70–43–1; the two clubs have combined for thirteen AFL/AFC championships. Six Bills players, coach Marv Levy, and team founder Ralph Wilson are enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame, while five Patriots players and coach Bill Parcells are presently enshrined in the Hall of Fame.

Bills Hall of Famer Jim Kelly compiled a 12–8 career record against the Patriots with 29 touchdowns and 28 interceptions;[2] O.J. Simpson compiled a 10–4 record against the Patriots with 14 rushing touchdowns and three touchdown catches.[3] Tom Brady presently holds a record of 26–3 against the Bills with 66 touchdowns and 20 interceptions.[4]

The 49ers–Rams rivalry began in 1950 and became one of the most intense in the National Football League in the 1970s as the two California based teams regularly competed for the NFL’s NFC West Division title. The intensity of the rivalry is due to the fact that the cities of San Francisco and Los Angeles have long been competitors in the economic, cultural, and political arenas. After the Rams’ move to St. Louis in 1995, the rivalry had lost its geographical lore though games were still intense regardless of the standings. The cultural differences between the West Coast (where the 49ers are based) and Midwest (where the Rams were based) also added to the intensity of the rivalry, until the Rams moved back to Los Angeles in 2016. Sports Illustrated considers their rivalry the 8th best of all time in the National Football League.[1]

The Houston Texans are a professional American football team based in Houston, Texas. The team competes in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the American Football Conference (AFC) South division. The Texans first played in 2002 as an expansion team, making them the youngest franchise in the NFL currently.[4] The Texans replaced Houston’s previous franchise, the Houston Oilers, which moved to Nashville, Tennessee and are now the Tennessee Titans. The team’s majority owner is Bob McNair. While the team mainly struggled in the 2000s, they clinched their first playoff berth during the 2011 season as AFC South division champions.[5] The Texans have gone on to win more AFC South championships in 2012, 2015, and 2016. To date, the Texans are the only NFL franchise to have never played in a conference championship game.
In 1997, Houston entrepreneur Bob McNair had a failed bid to bring a National Hockey League (NHL) expansion team to the city, and Bud Adams relocated the city’s NFL team.

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